Azure VM Disk Yapisi

Gecenlerde verdigim Azure egitiminden bir sunumu burada paylasmak istedim.

Bu cok begendigim bir resim cunku tek sayfada aslinda Azure VM tarafindaki disk yapilandirmasini bizlere aciklayabiliyor. Hizlica uzerinden gecelim.

  • Bildiginiz gibi Azure uzerinde veri tutmaya baslamak icin oncelikle Storage Account olusturmaniz gerekiyor. Bununla ilgili detayli seriler daha once yazmistim. Bu storage account icerisinde ardindan ihtiyaciniza gore table, blob, queue yada file hizmetlerini kullanabilirsiniz.

 

  • Azure VM lerinin diskleri storage account icerisinde blob hizmetinde tutulmaktadir. Daha detaya inersek Blob tarafinda Azure icerisinde uc farkli hizmetiniz var.
    • Append Blob
    • Page Blob
    • Block Blob

Azure VM leri disklerini page blob icerisinde tutulur. Page blob random read-write icin optimize edilmis ozel bir servistir.

  • Resimde goruldugu gibi sanal makineyi baslattiginiz anda size C:\ diski ve temporary bir D diski verilecektir. En onemli noktalardan birisi asla D:\ surucusunu kritik bilgiler icin kullanmamaniz. Bu VMin uzerinde calistigi fiziksel sunucudaki yerel bir disktir. Bu yuzden herhangi bir durumda VM’iniz baska bir fiziksel sunucuya tasindiginda otomatik olarak yeni bir D:\ surucusu size atanacaktir.

 

  • C:\ ve ek olarak eklediginiz data diskleri Azure Blob storage uzerinde tutulur. Bu sayede ayni datacenter icerisinde de uc tane farkli kopyasini bulundurma sansiniz var.

 

  • Data diskinizin boyutu maksimum 1TB olabilir. Eger bundan daha fazla diske ihtiyaciniz varsa Windows sunucular uzerinde Storage Spaces kullanarak (RAID benzeri teknoloji) birden fazla data diskini tek bir pool haline getirebilirsiniz.

Windows Docker networking – Part 2: Custom network types

In Part 1, we had a look at general networking details of Windows Container technology, and I explained how to configure NAT in Docker. In this part, we are going to talk about custom networks such as transparent networks, Layer 2 (L2) bridging, and L2 tunnelling in Docker for Windows.

Removing container networks

You may remember from the first part that we can easily change the IP prefix of the default NAT network by playing with the daemon.json Docker configuration file. The Docker engine also gives us a chance to create fully custom networks (for NAT and other types of drivers) using the command line.

Continue Reading…

Windows Container networking – Part 1: Configuring NAT

In this two part series, we are going to discuss general networking architecture, the types of network created by default, and how to create your own custom networks in Windows Container environments. In today’s post I will focus on the NAT configuration.

Containers are certainly one of the hottest topics today. This year, Microsoft partnered with Docker to bring the Docker platform to Windows Server 2016 by introducing Windows/Hyper-V containers as well as native Docker engine support. That’s a huge step for overall container technology to push them through to production in enterprise organizations.

Continue Reading…

Install Azure Stack in a nested Windows Server 2016 VM

If you want to test Azure Stack, you can install Microsoft’s hybrid cloud solution in a nested Windows Server 2016 Virtual Machine. In this post, I will walk you through the installation of Azure Stack TP2.

Azure Stack hardware requirements

TP2 has similar minimum hardware requirements as those of TP1:

  • 4 disks, each with a minimum of 140 GB of capacity (SSD or HDD); all available disks will be used.
  • 12 physical CPU cores
  • 96 GB of RAM
  • Hyper-V enabled (with SLAT support)

Continue Reading…

Setup and Boot Event Collection in Windows Server 2016

Windows Server 2016 introduced a new feature called “Setup and Boot Event Collection,” which allows you to remotely connect and start collecting events during the boot process of a Windows Server. That’s pretty useful, especially when it comes to troubleshooting problems that occur during the boot process.

One of the challenges during the Windows boot process is that you can’t actually see what’s going on under the hood. If your machine never booted, or you think the boot process takes tremendous time, it’s a challenge to start troubleshooting, as you have a limited number of ways to get boot events.

Continue Reading…

Install Nano Server with Microsoft’s Nano Server Image Builder

Microsoft released a new Nano Server Image Builder tool that allows you to install Window Server 2016 with a minimal footprint. For the last couple of months, everyone is talking about the new smaller, headless Windows Server 2016 deployment option: Nano Server. Microsoft is calling Nano Server the future of Windows Server.

In a nutshell, Nano Server is a new installation option for Windows Server 2016 that is designed and fully optimized for cloud-born applications, containers, or specific services you want to run on a small footprint. You can use it as a host for Hyper-V VMs, a DNS server, an IIS server, or containers.

Continue Reading…

Azure Storage Services – Useful tools

This is the last part of our Azure Storage Services series. Today we are going to discuss a couple of useful tools that you might want to leverage for interacting with Azure Storage Services.

When it comes to viewing and interacting with your content in Azure Storage Services, there are plenty of options. Some of these are tools are provided and maintained by Microsoft; some others are from third parties. We have also discussed some other options in this series such as Classic and the new Azure Portal, PowerShell, AzureCLI, REST API, or even Python used with the Azure Storage Library.

Let me give you a short overview of tools that you might find useful for your daily Azure Storage tasks.

Storage Explorer

Storage Explorer is a cross-platform desktop application that provides visibility for your Azure Storage accounts. You can download Storage Explorer for Windows, Mac, and Linux.

Storage Explorer enables you to access and browse your content in multiple storage accounts. Each version also offers extended capabilities, such as dealing with containers, queues, tables, and file shares. Most basic operations are already embedded in the tool, and you can easily achieve some of your daily maintenance tasks with it.

One of the best things about the new version is that it also supports either ARM-based or Classic deployments.

There are different options for connecting to your storage account. You can simply provide your SAS URI or account key for particular storage accounts, or you might want to sign into your subscription. If you choose to sign into your Azure account, subscriptions associated with this account will be listed.

Adding an Azure account in Storage Explorer

Adding an Azure account in Storage Explorer

Then all associated storage accounts will be shown in the left pane.

Listing storage accounts in Storage Explorer

Listing storage accounts in Storage Explorer

You can take a variety of actions, such as: editing blob properties/metadata, uploading blobs and folders, viewing or querying entities in tables, adding or deleting messages, and creating file shares.

Creating new file share in Storage Explorer

Creating new file share in Storage Explorer

On the top right hand side, you can see all available options available for this newly created file share.

Additional actions in Storage Explorer

Additional actions in Storage Explorer

You can also manage Stored Access Policies for different storage services.

Accessing policies in Storage Explorer

Accessing policies in Storage Explorer

In a nutshell, it’s a pretty powerful cross-platform tool that covers most daily operational tasks you may want to achieve with Azure cloud storage services.

Azure Web Storage Explorer

We also have a web version of Storage Explorer. Its source code is currently available in GitHub, and you can start using it at https://azurestorage.azurewebsites.net.

Logging into Azure Web Storage Explorer

Logging into Azure Web Storage Explorer

You need to provide your storage account name and access key.

Creating new container in Azure Web Storage Explorer

Creating new container in Azure Web Storage Explorer

Web Storage Explorer’s main differentiator is that it has a web-based interface, which means you can access it from anywhere without needing a local application or SDK.

Just like other tools, you can interact with blobs, tables, and queues. But the main question is: why would you want to use a web-based storage explorer rather than using the official Azure portal?

I also have to say that its GUI is nowhere close to being user friendly compared to other available tools or the Azure Portal.

ClumsyLeaf – AzureXplorer

AzureXplorer from ClumsyLeaf is a VS extension that helps you to manage storage accounts and interact with tables, blobs, and queues.

AzureXplorer VS extensio

AzureXplorer VS extensio

Once you complete the installation, you need to click View » Other Windows » AzureXplorer in Visual Studio and add your subscription/storage accounts.

Along with view capabilities, AzureXplorer also brings some advanced features, such as advanced filtering, export/import options, test data generator, drag-and-drop, and so on. It goes without saying that all these advanced features are available with a license.

http://clumsyleaf.com/products/azurexplorer

Visual Studio Server Explorer

Azure Tools for Visual Studio extends the capabilities of Visual Studio to support the deployment and management of your applications across on-premises and Azure infrastructure. With the latest version of Azure Tools, you can set up a complete cloud infrastructure using Azure Resource Manager.

One other advantage of Azure Tools for Visual Studio is that you can also leverage an existing Server Explorer node in VS to display all of your storage accounts and associated storage services.

To start viewing and managing your resources in Server Explorer, it’s sufficient to login to your Azure subscription and expand your storage account’s node in Server Explorer:

Listing storage accounts in Visual Studio

Listing storage accounts in Visual Studio

Azure Tools also helps you to interact with blobs, queues, and tables. You can create or delete blobs and containers, add or delete messages to/from existing queues, view or create tables, and interact with table data.

Creating a new container in Visual Studio

Creating a new container in Visual Studio

It’s also possible to create a new storage account by using Server Explorer. You can simply select “Create Storage Account” from the Server Explorer pane to do this.

Creating a new storage account in Visual Studio

Creating a new storage account in Visual Studio

 

Creating a new storage account

Creating a new storage account

I have personally started using Visual Studio with PowerShell tools. It’s a great extension for developing and debugging your PS scripts. Then I started to develop my ARM templates in VS. With the ability to interact with Azure Storage resources using Azure Tools, there is no doubt that Visual Studio will be getting more and more attention from datacenter engineers.

Conclusion

There are also other free and commercial tools available. This Microsoft page noted keeps track of these tools and their current functionalities.

That was the last part of our Azure Storage Services series. Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions or feedback!